Client and Patient Policies: Part I

Client and Patient Policies: Part I

Running a private practice is certainly an exciting and rewarding endeavor! But between handling everything on the business end – like expenses and bookkeeping – and everything on the practice end – like keeping track of each patient's needs – how can you find the time to assemble, organize and communicate your practice’s specific policies? At Healthy Bytes, we've made it easy for you with this series.

Can I charge my clients the difference between my hourly rate and what insurance paid?

Can I charge my clients the difference between my hourly rate and what insurance paid?

Balance Billing is the process of charging your clients the difference between your hourly rate and what insurance pays. This is tricky to get right and we do not recommend the practice of balance billing as it depends on the state you're in and the contract you signed with each insurance company.

Action Alert: Licensure in New York

Action Alert: Licensure in New York

The requirements for which individuals can call themselves 'dietitians' or 'nutritionists' and what each can do vary widely by state. Check out this map from the Center for Nutrition Advocacy to learn more.

In NY, however, where Healthy Bytes is headquartered, the protection is limited to certification at this time. But there's a bill that's looking to change that. If you’re a New York RDN or CNS and feel as strongly as we do about licensure, please take action by June 21st, 2017 and contact your senator.

Meet The Expert: Maree Ferguson

Meet The Expert: Maree Ferguson

Dream big!  In today’s digital age, the world is your oyster. - Maree Ferguson

It's been a few months since we've featured an expert on the blog, and we can't think of anyone better than Maree to kick-start the series again. Maree Ferguson, AdvAPD, RD, FAND, MBA, Ph.D., is the founder of Dietitian Connection and works endlessly to provide RDNs with resources to thrive in the field.

See what she has to say, below.

Type I vs. Type II NPIs

Type I vs. Type II NPIs

HIPAA regulations dictate that, as a health care provider working with health insurance companies, you need a National Provider Identifier (NPI) number. These 10-digit numbers are a way for the healthcare sector to identify health professionals consistently, and they are publicly searchable.

There are actually two types of NPIs, logically referred to as “Type I” and, yes, “Type II.” Type I NPIs are also sometimes called individual or personal NPIs, while Type II NPIs can be called either organizational or group NPIs.