Insurance Basics

Goal-Setting for the New Year

Goal-Setting for the New Year

This time of year is when we all find ourselves thinking of how we want the coming year to be even better than the year we’re leaving behind. What might you do differently to grow your private practice?  What new skills might you learn in order to generate new revenue streams? Here are a few resources from Healthy Bytes to help you set goals and take steps toward growing your nutrition business, including accepting health insurance on behalf of your clients!  

Private Practice Resources for Dietitians and Dietitians-To-Be

Private Practice Resources for Dietitians and Dietitians-To-Be

For those of you who are RDNs and dietitians-to-be with glimmers of opening up your own private practices in your eyes, this post is for you!

We invite you to spend some time with this post (set it as a bookmark, too!), as it contains numerous resources for launching your private practice.

Copayments: What You Need to Know

Copayments: What You Need to Know

How do you know whether to collect a copayment from your client? And if you do need to collect a co-pay, when do you collect it? Let’s dive in!  

Whether or not your client is required to pay a co-pay, or a fixed amount that one pays for a covered healthcare service after the deductible has been met, is determined by the client’s health insurance plan.

I’m Not a U.S. Citizen – Can I Get Credentialed and Contracted?

I’m Not a U.S. Citizen – Can I Get Credentialed and Contracted?

The team here at Healthy Bytes is sometimes asked whether, as a non-U.S. citizen, the process of undergoing credentialing and contracting with health insurance companies would be different than undertaking it as a U.S. citizen. While this question may not apply to many of you, there are students and entrepreneurs who hold U.S. visas that allow them temporary residency but not citizenship. How does this impact their ability to accept insurance? 

Understanding Remittance Advice

Understanding Remittance Advice

When you file a claim to an insurance company and it gets finalized, you, as the provider, will get remittance advice, which explains the insurance company’s rationale for that claim’s payment (or lack of). The remittance advice is sent to you as a written summary of what the insurance company will cover for a particular claim. The remittance advice outlines what the insurance company paid, the amount that was applied to a client’s deductible, and what amount may now be due from your client. It’s oftentimes accompanied by a check or statement of electronic payment.