HIPAA

Common Insurance Questions and Answers

Common Insurance Questions and Answers

We know that accepting insurance on behalf of your clients is a big step! But once you get familiar with the system, you’ll feel like a pro. Or – don’t worry about navigating the system, and leave the work to the Healthy Bytes billing allies. To get you started, we are answering a few common questions that we hear from you via email, phone and when we chat with you in person at conferences. We want to help you feel more comfortable with the insurance lingo and landscape.

HIPAA Series Part III: Which “Off-Site Offices” are HIPAA-Compliant?

HIPAA Series Part III: Which “Off-Site Offices” are HIPAA-Compliant?

An important feature of modern private practice is mobility. Technological developments have changed the dynamic between providers and patients, allowing for increased contact via social media and  telehealth appointments in addition to traditional office visits. These innovations have really changed the game, allowing RDNs to practice across state lines and in less traditional settings. However, along with these new opportunities have come new challenges when it comes to protecting PHI and remaining HIPAA compliant.

HIPAA Series Part II: Protect Your Office

HIPAA Series Part II: Protect Your Office

Part I of our HIPAA series discussed the importance of protecting patient data, or protected health information (PHI). In part II, let’s cover how to employ HIPAA best practices before, during and after your nutrition consults at your office, thus ultimately protecting your clients and practice as a result. 

HIPAA Series Part I: Protecting Patient Data

HIPAA Series Part I: Protecting Patient Data

One of the most important considerations when it comes to working with clients is being cognizant of their protected health information (PHI). PHI includes any information that can be used to identify a patient such as name, telephone number, social security number, etc. PHI has been protected since 1996 by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). While the specific provisions for compliance are constantly updated, the core principles remain the same: it is the responsibility of a covered entity to protect patient information and report any breaches.